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Products list

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The product list is extracted from DPR's product/label database and does not constitute a recommendation by DPR. A list of actively registered California pesticide products is generated for each management tactic recommended by UCIPM. Products are listed by tradenames, which are sometimes used for more than one active ingredient. Always read labels carefully and know which ingredients are in any pesticide being used.

To access the product list, click on the "PRODUCTS" button to the left of each practice:

image of Treatment Practices table

How product lists are generated

When you click on the “products list” button for a particular management tactic recommended by UCIPM, a search of the DPR product label database is automatically conducted. The SQL search uses the following variables:

  1. DPR chemical code(s) for active ingredient(s)
  2. UCIPM recommended formulation(s)
  3. UCIPM recommended application method(s)
  4. Target pest(s)
  5. A list of “site codes” that help narrow down the list of products to those more likely to be applied in schools (see below)
  6. Active California registrations only

Because there is no all-inclusive site code for schools, the product list is narrowed down using a series of site codes (see below). Also, the search may list products that contain multiple active ingredients, some of which may not be recommended by UCIPM. Therefore, some products are listed that are not appropriate for school use, and in some cases may be specifically prohibited for schools by the label language. Users should ALWAYS CONSULT THE PESTICIDE LABEL for information on allowable uses.

For the parameters used for a particular product search, click the "HOW THIS LIST WAS GENERATED" link on the products list page

image of Products Table with red arrow pointint to How this list was generated link

References

Product and use data, California Department of Pesticide Regulation.


Site codes

The “site code” is a variable developed by the U.S. EPA for pesticide registration use. In agricultural settings, the site code usually refers to a crop, such as grapes or wheat. In urban settings, site codes usually refer to the pest management setting, for example, “COMMERCIAL, INSTITUTIONAL OR INDUSTRIAL AREAS,” or “RIGHTS OF WAY.” However, in some instances the codes may also refer to a target pest, such as “COCKROACHES (ORTHOPTERA).”

Because there is no all-inclusive site code for schools, the product list is narrowed down using a series of site codes (see below), plus other variables specific to specific tactic (see "How product lists are generated" above).. Again, users should ALWAYS CONSULT THE PESTICIDE LABEL for information on allowable uses.

Site codes used in products searches are:

31000 ORNAMENTAL HERBACEOUS PLANTS (ALL OR UNSPEC)
31003 ORNAMENTAL HERBACEOUS FLOWERING PLANTS (ALL/UN)
31004 ORNAMENTAL HERBACEOUS FOLIAGE PLANTS (ALL/UN)
31005 ORNAMENTAL BULB, CORM, RHIZOME PLANTS (ALL/UNSPEC)
31006 ORNAMENTAL HERBACEOUS PERENNIAL PLANTS
31007 ORNAMENTAL HERBACEOUS ANNUAL PLANTS (ALL/UNSPEC)
32001 ORNAMENTAL WOODY PLANTS (ALL OR UNSPEC)
32002 ORNAMENTAL VINES (HERB. & WOODY) (ALL OR UNSPEC.)
32003 ORNAMENTAL BROADLEAF EVERGREENS (ALL OR UNSPEC)
32004 ORNAMENTAL PLANTS (DECIDUOUS) (ALL OR UNSPEC)
32005 ORNAMENTAL EVERGREENS (ALL OR UNSPEC)
32006 ORNAMENTAL PERENNIALS (ALL OR UNSPEC) (FLAG-"W")
33008 ORNAMENTAL TURF (ALL OR UNSPEC)
33009 ORNAMENTAL GROUND COVERS (ALL OR UNSPEC)
33010 ORNAMENTAL LAWNS, LAWNS (ALL OR UNSPEC)
34000 ORNAMENTAL SHRUBS (ALL OR UNSPEC) (WOODY/HERB.)
34004 ORNAMENTAL WOODY SHRUBS
34005 ORNAMENTAL WOODY VINES
34006 ORNAMENTAL BROADLEAF EVERGREEN SHRUBS
34007 ORNAMENTAL DECIDUOUS SHRUBS
35000 ORNAMENTAL AND/OR SHADE TREES (ALL OR UNSPEC)
35005 ORNAMENTAL BROADLEAF EVERGREEN TREES (ALL/UNSPEC)
35006 ORNAMENTAL DECIDUOUS TREES (ALL OR UNSPEC)
35007 ORNAMENTAL CONIFERS (ALL OR UNSPEC)
35008 ORNAMENTAL FLOWERING TREES (FRUIT, NUT, ETC.)
39000 ORNAMENTAL NONFLOWERING PLANTS (ALL OR UNSPEC)
39001 ORNAMENTAL FERNS (ALL OR UNSPEC)
39003 ORNAMENTAL NURSERIES (STOCK, CROPS, ETC.)
46039 NON FEED/FOOD STORAGE AREAS (UNSPECIFIED)
63000 HOUSEHOLD OR DOMESTIC DWELLINGS (ALL OR UNSPEC)
63001 HOUSEHOLD OR DOMESTIC DWELLINGS (INDOOR)
63002 CRACKS & CREVICES
63003 HOUSEHOLD OR DOMESTIC DWELLINGS (OUTDOOR)
63503 CRACKS & CREVICES
64000 WOOD OR WOOD STRUCTURE PROTECTION TREATMENTS
64006 WOOD PROTECTION – WOODEN AQUATIC STRUCTURES, ITEMS
64501 LUMBER (SEASONED/UNSEASONED)
64502 WOOD STRUCTURES: ABOVE GROUND & FINISHED STRUCT
64504 WOOD STRUCTURES: INDOOR/ENCLOSED AREAS
67002 RECREATIONAL AREAS, TENNIS COURTS, PARKS, ETC.
67003 BUILDINGS AND STRUCTURES (NON-AG OUTDOOR)
67011 PAVED AREAS, PRE-PAVING APPLICATIONS
68003 PUBLIC BUILDINGS AND STRUCTURES (VERT. PESTS)
72001 EATING ESTABLISHMENT FOOD HANDLING AREAS
72002 EATING ESTABLISHMENT FOOD SERVING AREAS
72003 EATING ESTABLISH. (FOOD HANDLING/SERVING AREA)
72004 EATING ESTABLISHMENTS (NON-FOOD AREAS)
72501 EATING ESTABLISHMENTS (FOOD HANDLING/SERVING AREA)
77000 COMMERCIAL, INSTITUTIONAL OR INDUSTRIAL AREAS
77001 SCHOOLS
77501 SCHOOLS (INDOOR) (SCHOOL YARDS USE 67002)
89006 GARBAGE DISPOSAL UNITS, FOOD DISPOSALS

References

Product and use data, California Department of Pesticide Regulation.
U.S. EPA reference on site codes. Compressed file.


U.S. EPA signal word

A signal word is a description of the acute (short-term) toxicity of a formulated pesticide product. Formulated pesticide products contain both active and inert ingredients. Active ingredients kill or control the pest the product is designed for, while inert ingredients allow the pesticide to be effectively applied against the pest. Examples of inerts are solvents, carriers, stickers, and adjuvants. The acute toxicity is the toxicity of a chemical after a single or short-term exposure.

The signal words are: DANGER, WARNING, and CAUTION. The assignment of a signal word to a pesticide product is based on acute oral, dermal, or inhalation toxicity or on effects to skin or eyes.

As part of the pesticide registration process, the U.S. EPA requires that toxicological studies by conducted for each of these five exposure routes (oral, dermal, etc.). For each exposure route, a "toxicity category" is assigned according to Table 1 below, with I being the most toxic and IV the least toxic. The signal word is determined by the most severe toxicity category assigned to the five acute toxicity studies, or by the presence of special inerts ( methanol in concentrations of 4% or more).

Toxicity Category I - DANGER
Toxicity Category II - WARNING
Toxicity Categories III & IV - CAUTION

For example, if studies show that Product "A" has a Toxicity Category I for inhalation toxicity but Toxicity Category IV for the other exposure routes, the correct signal word would be DANGER.


Table 1 - Toxicity Categories

Study Category I Category II Category III Category IV
Acute Oral Up to and including 50 mg/kg > 50 thru 500 mg/kg > 500 thru 5000 mg/kg > 5000 mg/kg
Acute Dermal Up to and including 200 mg/kg > 200 thru 2000 mg/kg > 2000 thru 5000 mg/kg > 5000 mg/kg
Acute Inhalation1 Up to and including 0.05 mg/liter > 0.05 thru 0.5 mg/liter > 0.5 thru 2 mg/liter > 2 mg/liter
Eye Irritation Corrosive (irreversible destruction of ocular tissue) or corneal involvement or irritation persisting for more than 21 days Corneal involvement or irritation clearing in 8-21 days Corneal involvement or irritation clearing in 7 days or less Minimal effects clearing in less than 24 hours
Skin Irritation Corrosive (tissue destruction into the dermis and/or scarring) Severe irritation at 72 hours (severe erythema or edema) Moderate irritation at 72 hours (moderate erythema) Mild or slight irritation (no irritation or slight erythema)
1 4 hr exposure

In addition to the signal words, the word "POISON" and the skull and crossbones symbol are required whenever a product is classified as toxicity category I due to the results of either the acute oral, acute dermal, or acute inhalation toxicity studies, or if particular inerts ( Methanol 4% or more) are present in the product. For example, if Product "B" has a Toxicity Category I for "skin irritation" and Toxicity Category III for other exposure routes, the correct signal word would be DANGER, without the word POISON. However, if Product "C" has Toxicity Category I for "dermal toxicity" and Toxicity Category III for other exposure routes, the correct signal word would be DANGER with the word POISON and a skull and crossbones symbol.

References

U.S. EPA Label Review Manual, Chapter 8: Precautionary Labeling [external web site].
Signal Words [pdf][external web site]. National Pesticide Information Center (NPIC) Fact Sheet, Oregon State University.


Restricted use Status

Pesticides classified for restricted use are those the U.S. EPA has determined may be hazardous to human health or the environment even when used according to label directions. Restricted use pesticides can be bought and used only by, or under the direct supervision of, a certified pesticide applicator who has received training and demonstrated competency in the use of such products. Following label directions and applying principles and techniques learned in certification training enables applicators to use these pesticides without causing undue harm to themselves, others, or the environment.

All products given restricted status by the U.S. EPA are automatically considered restricted under California law, assuming they are registered for use in the California. In addition, California regulations (3 CCR 6400) require that certain other pesticides be restricted, for example, chemicals known as potential groundwater contaminants, products granted emergency use (Section 18) exemptions, and others.

References

Pesticide Information Leaflet No. 2, Maryland Cooperative Extension, University of Maryland. Reviewed Jan., 2000.
Restricted Materials, California Code of Regulations (Title 3. Food and Agriculture), Section 6400

Management tactics from UCIPM

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This list is extracted from the Pest Notes series, published by the University of California Statewide Integrated Pest Management Program (UCIPM). Pest Notes are authored primarily by University of California scientists. Authors are noted on each document. Before publication, each manuscript goes through a UC Agriculture and Natural Resources (ANR) peer-review process and receives an ANR publication number. Once published, each document is reviewed periodically—at least every three years—but usually more often.

When planning a pest management strategy, it is important to consult the biology and management section of the Pest Note first. The information contained in the table alone is not sufficient for making management decisions. For example, some pesticides listed may be materials of last resort. You would not know this merely by looking at the table, which is not listed in order of preference. You may click on the hyperlinks for each tactic to get specific details on that method.

Tactics on this page are sorted automatically. Preventive practices are always in the first section. Within 'treatment practices,' tactics that do not require any pesticide use are displayed at the top. Tactics that involve traps, baits or gels/pastes

References

About Pest Management and Identification Databases [external web site], University of California Statewide Integrated Pest Management (UCIPM) web site.

Information on toxicity

Toxicity is an inherent property of all substances. It is defined as the capacity of a chemical to do harm to an organism by other than mechanical means. In acute toxicity, poisoning occurs after a single or short-term exposure (effects shortly after exposure). Chronic toxicity means the effects of long term or repeated low level exposures to a toxic substance (cancer, liver damage, reproductive disorders, etc.).

All chemical substances can produce adverse health effects at some level of exposure. Risk is the likelihood that an adverse effect will result from an exposure (or exposures) to a particular amount (dose) of a chemical. Therefore, risk is a function of both toxicity and exposure.

Information is provided here only on active ingredients, not on inert ingredients. The active ingredient is generally-but not always-considered to be the most hazardous ingredient of a pesticide preparation. Fact sheets are not available for all active ingredients; lack of fact sheet information does not imply that an ingredient is safe.

References

Guide to Health Risk Assessment [external web site] [pdf], published by the Office of Environmental and Health Hazard Assessment, California Environmental Protection Agency.
Pesticide Risk Assessment: Why, How, What and Where. Written by DPR staff for the December 1998 issue of CAPCA Advisor, the magazine of the California Agricultural Production Consultants Association
Toxics and Pesticides Glossary [external web site], U.S. EPA.


Note on “inert” ingredients

In September 1997, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued Pesticide Regulation Notice 97-6 which encourages manufacturers, formulators, producers, and registrants of pesticide products to voluntarily substitute the term “other ingredients” as a heading for the “inert” ingredients in the ingredient Statement. EPA made this change after learning the results of a consumer survey on the use of household pesticides. Many comments from the public and the consumer interviews prompted EPA to discontinue the use of the term “inert.” Many consumers are misled by the term “inert ingredient”, believing it to mean “harmless.” Since neither the Federal law nor the regulations define the term “inert” on the basis of toxicity, hazard, or risk to humans, non-target species, or the environment, it should not be assumed that all inert ingredients are non-toxic.In September 1997, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued Pesticide Regulation Notice 97-6 which encourages manufacturers, formulators, producers, and registrants of pesticide products to voluntarily substitute the term "other ingredients" as a heading for the ”inert” ingredients in the ingredient Statement. EPA made this change after learning the results of a consumer survey on the use of household pesticides. Many comments from the public and the consumer interviews prompted EPA to discontinue the use of the term "inert." Many consumers are misled by the term “inert ingredient”, believing it to mean ”harmless.” Since neither the Federal law nor the regulations define the term ”inert” on the basis of toxicity, hazard, or risk to humans, non-target species, or the environment, it should not be assumed that all inert ingredients are non-toxic.

References

Inert ingredients in pesticide products [external web site], U.S. EPA.


EXTOXNET Pesticide Information Profiles

Pesticide Information Profiles (PIPs) provide specific information on pesticides, written for the general public. The EXTension TOXicology NETwork (EXTOXNET ) is a cooperative effort of University of California-Davis, Oregon State University, Michigan State University, Cornell University, and the University of Idaho. Primary files are maintained and archived at Oregon State University. This link allows direct access to the appropriate PIP. Note that PIPs are not available for all active ingredients.

References

EXTOXNET Global Search Page [external web site], Oregon State University.


U.S. EPA Reregistration Eligibility Decision Fact Sheet

Reregistration Eligibility Decision (RED) documents contain the results of the U.S. EPA's reviews of pesticides that were first registered before November 1, 1984. Under the federal pesticide law FIFRA, EPA must review the human health and environmental effects of these older pesticide active ingredients to ensure they meet current safety standards. The RED fact sheets contain regulatory histories, regulatory changes required, human health assessments and environmental assessments in a condensed form.

The U.S. EPA's indexing system for these files, and the frequency of updating, makes direct links to the appropriate fact sheets impractical at this time. However, active ingredients can easily be looked up in the reregistration table, under the "fact sheets" column on the right side of the page. As with EXTOXNET, fact sheets are not available for all active ingredients.

References

Pesticide Tolerance Reassessment & Reregistration [external web site], U.S. EPA.


National Pesticide Information Center - General Fact Sheet

National Pesticide Information Center (NPIC) General Fact Sheets are designed to answer questions that are commonly asked by the general public about pesticidesthat are regulated by the U.S. EPA. These documents are intended to be helpful to professionals and to the general public for making decisions about pesticide use. Specific source references and the date of last review is noted at the bottom of each fact sheet.


National Pesticide Information Center - Technical Fact Sheet

National Pesticide Information Center (NPIC) Technical Fact Sheets are designed to provide information that is technical in nature for individuals with a scientific background or familiarity with the regulation of pesticides by the U.S. EPA. These documents are intended to be helpful to professionals and to the general public for making decisions about pesticide use. Specific source references and the date of last review is noted at the bottom of each fact sheet.

References

National Pesticide Information Center Home Page [external web site]

Factors that could reduce exposure

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This is not an exhaustive list of factors that effect pesticide exposure.


Preventive measure

Prevention is one of the keys to a sound pest management program, and should always be the first tactic considered. In combination with a pest monitoring program, good preventative techniques reduce the need to use pesticides. For this reason, preventative tactics are always listed first.

References

Stern, V. M., R. F. Smith, R. van den Bosch, and K. S. Hagen. 1959. The integrated control concept. Hilgardia, 29: 81-101.


No pesticides required

Practices with a check mark in this column require no pesticide use.


Gel or paste used for crack-and-crevice treatment

Using pesticides formulated as a gel or paste for crack-and-crevice treatments generally results in lower exposure than pesticides formulated as sprays or dusts. During applications, gel and paste formulations are less likely to give airborne pesticide residues than are dusts and sprays. Also, the rate of pesticide volatilization is slowed with crack-and-crevice treatments, because the pesticide is placed in areas with reduced exposure to air and light. The lower concentration of pesticide in the air means reduced exposure for people entering the area after the application.


Bait

Pesticides formulated as baits generally use smaller amounts of active ingredient and result in lower exposure levels.


Trap

Pesticides formulated as traps generally use smaller amounts of active ingredient and result in lower exposure levels.

Regulatory Status

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FIFRA 25(b) Minimum Risk Pesticides

This pest management tactic, if checked, uses an active ingredient on the U.S. EPA's FIFRA 25(b) "minimum risk" list. Products containing this active ingredient may be exempt from federal registration, and therefore automatically exempt from the posting, notification and recordkeeping requirements of the the Healthy Schools Act of 2000 - see the Exempt Products Worksheet.. However, products containing FIFRA 25(b)active ingredients are not necessarily exempt from federal or state registration. Other criteria concerning inert ingredients and label language must also be satisfied.

In 1996, EPA exempted certain "minimum risk" pesticides from FIFRA requirements if they satisfy certain conditions. EPA exempted the products in part to reduce the cost and regulatory burdens on businesses as well as the public for pesticides posing little or no risk, and to focus EPA’s limited resources on pesticides which pose greater risk to humans and the environment. This exemption provision is located in section 152.25(g) of Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations.

To qualify for an exemption as a minimum risk pesticide, each active ingredient in the pesticide product must be listed in 40 CFR 152.25(g)(1). Currently, this list contains more than 30 active ingredients. In addition, 40 CFR 152.25(g)(2) provides that these pesticide products may only contain minimal risk inert ingredients listed in the most current 4A List. Additionally, to be exempted and remain exempted, products must also meet a series of exemption conditions described in 40 CFR 152.25(g)(3). Products must meet additional criteria to be exempted from registration in California (see below); however, only the federal exemption is required by the Healthy Schools Act of 2000.

Neither the U.S. EPA nor DPR reviews or issues notices of exemption for products which meet the conditions for exemption. Sale or distribution of a pesticide product meeting all the criteria in 40 CFR 152.25(g) without a federal registration is not a violation of FIFRA. However, if a product does not meet all of the exemption criteria, the product is not exempt from FIFRA and its sale or distribution if not registered would be a violation of FIFRA.

References

Pesticide Registration (Pr) Notice 2000-6 (May 7, 2000). Notice To Manufacturers, Formulators, Producers And Registrants Of Pesticide Products [external web site] . U.S. EPA.

List of FIFRA 25(b) active ingredients [external web site]. U.S. EPA.

List of “inert” ingredients (4A list) [external web site] [PDF, 144 kb]. U.S. EPA.

California Notice to Registrants 2000-6. DPR.


Proposition 65 carcinogen or reproductive toxicant

Proposition 65, the Safe Drinking Water and Toxic Enforcement Act of 1986, was enacted as a California ballot initiative in November 1986. The Proposition was intended by its authors to protect California citizens and the State's drinking water sources from chemicals known to cause cancer, birth defects or other reproductive harm, and to inform citizens about exposures to such chemicals. Proposition 65 requires the Governor to publish, at least annually, a list of chemicals known to the state to cause cancer or reproductive toxicity. According to the Act, “A chemical is known to the state to cause cancer or reproductive toxicity within the meaning of this chapter if in the opinion of the state's qualified experts it has been clearly shown through scientifically valid testing according to generally accepted principles to cause cancer or reproductive toxicity, or if a body considered to be authoritative by such experts has formally identified it as causing cancer or reproductive toxicity, or if an agency of the state or federal government has formally required it to be labeled or identified as causing cancer or reproductive toxicity.”

The California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment (OEHHA) divides its endpoints of concern into three categories for reproductive toxicants: Developmental - male, developmental - female, and developmental. These endpoints have been lumped into “reproductive toxicant” for the purposes of this web site.

References

Proposition 65: law, regulations and rulemaking activity [external web site]. Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment (OEHHA), California Environmental Protection Agency.

Plain-language summary of Proposition 65 [external web site]. OEHHA, CalEPA.


U.S. EPA Biopesticides

Biopesticides are a category of pesticides derived from such natural materials as animals, plants, bacteria, and certain minerals. For example, canola oil and baking soda have pesticidal applications and are considered biopesticides. At the end of 2001, there were approximately 195 registered biopesticide active ingredients and 780 products. Biopesticides fall into three major classes:

(1) Microbial pesticides consist of a microorganism (e.g., a bacterium, fungus, virus or protozoan) as the active ingredient. Microbial pesticides can control many different kinds of pests, although each separate active ingredient is relatively specific for its target pest[s]. For example, there are fungi that control certain weeds, and other fungi that kill specific insects.

(2) Plant-Incorporated-Protectants (PIPs) are pesticidal substances that plants produce from genetic material that has been added to the plant. These are commonly referred to as transgenic plants or genetically modified organisms (GMOs).

(3) Biochemical pesticides. Biochemical pesticides are naturally occurring substances that control pests by non-toxic mechanisms. Conventional pesticides, by contrast, are generally synthetic materials that directly kill or inactivate the pest. Biochemical pesticides include substances, such as insect sex pheromones, that interfere with mating, as well as various scented plant extracts that attract insect pests to traps. Because it is sometimes difficult to determine whether a substance meets the criteria for classification as a biochemical pesticide, EPA has established a special committee to make such decisions.

In general, biopesticides are inherently less toxic than conventional pesticides, and may be more specific to particular target pests. Many biopesticides are effective in very small quantities and often decompose quickly, thereby resulting in lower exposures and largely avoiding the pollution problems caused by conventional pesticides.

When used as a component of Integrated Pest Management (IPM) programs, biopesticides can greatly decrease the use of conventional pesticides, without sacrificing efficacy. To use some biopesticides effectively, however, users need to know a great deal about managing pests.

Since biopesticides tend to pose fewer risks than conventional pesticides, EPA generally requires much less data to register a biopesticide than to register a conventional pesticide. While biopesticides require less data and are registered in less time than conventional pesticides, EPA always conducts reviews to ensure that pesticides will not have adverse effects on human health or the environment. For EPA to be sure that a pesticide is safe, the Agency requires that registrants submit a variety of data about the composition, toxicity, degradation, and other characteristics of the pesticide.

References

What are Biopesticides? [external web site] U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

Regulating Biopesticides [external web site]. U.S. EPA.


Potential consequences of not treating

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Some pests pose public health or liability hazards for schools, or may cause costly structural damage to buildings. Other pests may cause only aesthetic damage. The extent and kind of hazards should be considered when planning pest management programs.

For example, local public health codes may require schools to treat for certain pests, such as cockroaches in food preparation areas. In such cases, school pest managers may have little choice but to use pesticides. However, in situations involving purely aesthetic damage, pesticide use can often be reduced without economic or public health consequences.

The data presented here was compiled by DPR staff from authoritative sources, and subjected to an internal review process to ensure accuracy.

References

Stauffer, S., Ferrentino, R., Koplinka C. and K. Sharpe, 1998. IPM Workbook for New York State Schools [external web site]. Cornell Cooperative Extension Community IPM Program.

Penagos, H., O'Malley, M., and H. Maibach, 2001. Pesticide Dermatoses. Dermatology: Clinical & Basic Science Series. CRC Press, Washington D.C., 2001.

University of California Pest Management Guidelines [external web site]. University of California Statewide Integrated Pest Management Program (UCIPM).